Two Dozen Basic Management Principles — (Pt. 15)

Chapter 12 Professional Lopez went back to Flagstaff after returning from Africa to get ready for the fall semester and the upcoming cross-country season. But this season, something had changed. On long runs, Lopez’ mind raced back to Sudan. He saw the faces of the children as they played in the dirt. Here he was, working on his college degree and those children had no hope of any kind of education. He felt guilty being there. “I have to do something,” he thought. “God, help me know what to do.” The money his American parents sent his African family each month made a tremendous difference in their lives. But Lopez did not feel right about asking Rob and Barb to continue supporting his family. After Dominic, Peter, and Lopez graduated and moved out, the Rogers brought in three more lost boys to live with them. The Rogers had done enough for Lopez already. Lopez needed to take over this responsibility himself. After he won the 1500 NCAA Championship, reps from different shoe companies let him know in a roundabout way that they would be open to sponsoring him when and if he decided to turn pro. Lopez spoke with Coach Hayes and they decided that Lopez should stay through the 2007 cross-country season, turn pro in December, and train exclusively for the 2008 Olympics in the Spring. “You can always negotiate to have your sponsors pay for your college so you can go back to school during the off season,” Hayes told Lopez. Lopez liked the sound of that. He wanted his degree but he knew he had to make one more phone call. “Hello,” Barb said. “Hi Mom, it’s me, Lopez.” Lopez’ heart raced because he did not know how they would take his news. “I have decided to drop out of school and turn professional in track,” he said. Before Barb could say anything, he added, “I only have three semesters of work left to finish my degree, which I can do during the off seasons. I give you my word that I will get my degree.” Neither of his parents said anything for what felt like a long time (Dad had...

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Biblical Theology — 3/4

Biblical Theology — 3/4 The Promised Kingdom/The Partial Kingdom Review Last week we learned that at the end of Genesis 11, that the Kingdom of God (God’s people, in God’s place, under God’s rule, and enjoying God’s blessing) was in disarray. There was not a specific people of God, man had been banished from the Garden, man was rejecting the rule of God, and as a result was suffering the curse of God rather than His blessing. For purposes of our study of biblical theology (study of the unity of the message of the Bible), we have called this epoch (or age) — The Perished Kingdom. Genesis 3-12 In Genesis 3-12, we see, even in the midst of disaster, a ray of hope. We see the promise of the reestablishment of the Kingdom. Notice four examples of this hope: 1. A Eternal Plan • Ephesians 1:3-6 • Even before the disobedience of Adam and Eve, before they or anything else even existed, God had already decided on a rescue operation. He had determined from eternity to call a people to Himself through His Son Jesus and restore everything under Him. 2. The Serpent Crusher • Genesis 3:15 • Protoevangelium 3. Amazing Grace • Noahic Covenant (Gen. 6:18; 9:1-17) • Two important words are used for the first time in the Bible — grace and covenant. • Noah finds grace in the eyes of the Lord. • God’s covenant distinguishes between those who are chosen as the objects of blessing, those who will somehow share this blessing, and those who are under judgment. • God makes a unilateral covenant to preserve His creation and never again to destroy it by a flood. 4. The Promise • Genesis 12:1-3 • John Stott writes: “It may truly be said without exaggeration that not only the rest of the Old Testament but the whole of the New Testament are an outworking of the promise made by God to Abraham.” • There are four main elements to the promises made to Abraham — people (many descendants), land, God will be their God, and through them all the nations of the world will be blessed. • Some important biblical themes...

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Biblical Theology — 2

Biblical Theology — 2 The Perished Kingdom Review Last week we learned that at the end of Genesis 2, we learned that the Kingdom of God (God’s people, in God’s place, under God’s rule, and enjoying God’s blessing) had been established. For purposes of our study of biblical theology (study of the unity of the message of the Bible), we have called this epoch (or age) — The Pattern of the Kingdom. Genesis 3 In Genesis 3, we see how quickly everything is ruined by human sin. Notice three important truths in this chapter: 1. A Talking Snake • It all begins with a talking snake (Gen. 3:1). • It raises all sorts of questions: Who is this serpent? Where does he come from? How can a snake speak? Is this story real? Where did evil come from? • How we should treat this story is guided by the gospel and the overall message of the Bible. The gospel makes sense only if there was a real temptation and fall which radically altered the course of human nature and the history of mankind thereafter. • The humans existed in God’s creation and depended on God’s word for the true interpretation of reality. • So the snake raises the first question: “Did God really say ‘You must not eat from any tree in the garden’?” (Gen. 3:2) • The assumption was being formed that the word not only could be analyzed and evaluated, but probably needed to be. But on what basis could Eve evaluate God’s word? Any standard for testing the truth of God’s word would have to be the word of an even greater authority than God (which is impossible). • The next statement of the snake actually contradicts the word of God: “You will not surely die. For God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.” (Gen. 3:4-5) God is accused of being selfish, unloving, and untrustworthy. 2. An Act of Rebellion • The serpent is cunning. These lies are presented in the context of truth. • Eating the forbidden fruit did indeed mean that the humans...

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